News

The Czech Republic has gone from a model COVID-19 country to the brink of a second lockdown

What has gone wrong? Dr. Jiří Černý, a leading virologist at the Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences at Czech University of Life Sciences gave an interview to Deutsche Welle, a global English-language news and information channel, explaining the recent surge of coronavirus in the Czech Republic.

FTA from Ethiopia: How to improve production and processing of fruits?

As part of the project “Arba Minch Fruit Value Chain”, three FTA representatives (Anna Maňourová, William Nkomoki and Jan Staš) together with experts from Mendel University in Brno went to Ethiopia to kick-off a new four-year development project. Its aim is improvement of the knowledge and skills of local farmers, diversifying the local fruit production, opening new business opportunities for farmers and last but not least on the reduction of post-harvest losses. 

YPARD Global – Network Engagement Coordinator (Full-time position)

Through the Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences (FTA) of Czech University of Life Sciences Prague (CZU), the joint secretariat of the Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) and the Global Forum for Rural Advisory Services (GFRAS) in Switzerland is seeking a dynamic, independent and innovative young professional for the position of the YPARD Global Network Engagement Coordinator (full-time position).

The Network Engagement Coordinator is responsible for ensuring and monitoring the active engagement of the YPARD community. The incumbent‘s work is partly framed by the communications strategies developed with the communications team and it entails the design and implementation of online and onsite innovative, collaborative and vibrant activities. The incumbent reports to the YPARD Director and works closely with the Communications Coordinator and the Digital Communication Officer. The incumbent will be based in FTA/CZU, Prague, Czech Republic, which hosts the YPARD Europe office.

Ever heard of Fuafua or Mamala?

Nope? You might in the future because some of these plants used in Samoan traditional medicine for treatment of wounds, burns and sores produce healing effects on the skin tissue and inhibit growth of bacteria infecting wounds. 

Sign up to the Tropics!